The Power Of Christ, Or The Power Of Suggestion?

06.03.2010 · Posted in Medical Mystery
Hermannsburg_NT

Photo by C. Goodwin

An Australian woman says her illness was cured when she drank from a holy tap in Hermannsburg.  The tap is located next to a former Lutheran church, and aboriginal people believe the tap is therefore on holy ground. Lutheran officials are uneasy about the whole thing and hope to avoid a mass influx of people seeking to drink from the tap to cure their ailments. Hundreds of people have already done so, however, so the clergy may be out of luck.

The precinct manager for Hermannsburg, Heidi Williams, says the piping in the area is in need of repair but she is now afraid to make the repairs lest that change the properties of the water (and make the pilgrims and their money go away, I would imagine).

People will do strange things when they’re desperate for healing or desperate for dollars.

There is no word on what the nature of the woman’s illness was, nor are their other accounts of particular ailments being cured. The power of suggestion is strong, though, and perhaps plain old water can have healing power via the placebo effect. Maybe the water is particularly blessed because of its location. Perhaps the deteriorating pipes have allowed in some mineral contamination that helps with certain conditions. Whatever the cause, no harm seems to be coming to anyone, aside from a nuisance to the church next door, and people are feeling like they are getting their needs met.

– Julie

Sources:
http://www.ntnews.com.au/article/2010/05/26/150421_ntnews.html
http://www.couriermail.com.au/entertainment/weird/hundreds-flock-to-hermannsburg-to-partake-in-holy-tap-water-from-side-of-lutheran-church/story-e6frep26-1225871838363

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One Response to “The Power Of Christ, Or The Power Of Suggestion?”

  1. Heidi Williams says:

    I just wish to clarify that there was no monetary benefit to exploit anyone coming to the Precinct. In actual fact the community owns it. The tap was in a common area upon which the community owned entity that governs the site pays rates for. There is nothing wrong with someone holding a belief, and there wasn’t masses of people as you suggest or any holy pilgrimage, just people filling up plastic bottles of water that their business pays rates for that they believed was doing good things. Maybe the mineral content was higher, maybe the fact that peoples water consumption was increased was a factor. What does it matter?

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